Agricultural Crops Production NC III TESDA Course – List of Schools

Agricultural Crops Production National Certificate III (TESDA Course)

The Agricultural Crops Production NC III Qualification consists of competencies that a person must achieve in managing small farm. Specifically it involves competencies in making decision and carrying out competencies in relation to establishment, maintenance and harvesting of agronomic crops such as coarse grains, grain legumes, coffee, coconuts, cotton, soya beans, peanuts and sugar cane. Workers at this level would be working autonomously and likely to own a small enterprise or work within a cooperative structure.

This Qualification is packaged from the competency map of the Agriculture and Fisheries Sector.

A person who has achieved this Qualification is competent to be:

  • Independent Farmer (Owner / Operator in a smaller operation
  • Leading hand

AGRICULTURAL CROPS PRODUCTION NC III QUALIFICATION

Course Title: AGRICULTURAL CROPS PRODUCTION
Level: NC III
Nominal Training Duration : 445 Hours

This course is designed to enhance the knowledge, skills and attitude of Tailor in accordance with industry standards. In general, it covers core competencies on undertaking preparation of land for agricultural crop production, implementing a post-harvest program, implementing a plant nutrition program, controlling weeds and preparing and applying chemicals. In agronomic, it covers core competencies on establishing agronomic crops, undertaking agronomic crop maintenance activities, undertaking agronomic crop harvesting activities, saving, preparing and storing agricultural seed and implementing vertebrate pest control program.

These guidelines are set to provide the Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) providers with information and other important requirements to consider when designing training programs for AGRICULTURAL CROPS PRODUCTION NC III

TRAINEE ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Trainees or students wishing to gain entry into this course should possess the following requirements:

  1. can communicate either oral and written
  2. physically and mentally fit
  3. with good moral character
  4. can perform basic mathematical computation

COMPETENCIES REQUIRED IN AGRICULTURAL CROPS PRODUCTION NC III

This units of competency comprising this qualification include the following:

CORE COMPETENCIES (413 Hours)

UNIT CODE CORE COMPETENCIES
AGR611310 Prepare land for agricultural crop production
AGR611311 Implement post-harvest program
AGR611312 Implement plant nutrition program
AGR611313 Control weeds
AGR611320 Establish agronomic crops
AGR611321 Undertake agronomic crop maintenance activities
AGR611322 Undertake agronomic crop harvesting activities
AGR611323 Save, prepare and store agricultural seed
AGR611324 Implement vertebrate pest control program

PREPARE LAND FOR AGRICULTURAL CROP PRODUCTION (AGR611310) – This unit covers the skills and knowledge required to prepare equipment, cultivate the site, apply any pre-planting treatments, and care for the vehicles and equipment on completing the activity. Equipment and machinery may be animal-powered. It includes the completion of documentation and logbooks for the operation. Preparing land for crop production is likely to be carried out under limited supervision from others with checking only related to overall progress. Preparing land for crop production is usually done within established routines, methods and procedures. Some discretion and judgement is required in the selection of equipment and materials, organization of work and services.

  1. Prepare for cultivation
    • Requirements for the work to be undertaken are interpreted from the planting plan and confirmed with the manager.
    • The method and order of cultivation is identified and interpreted from the planting plan.
    • OHS hazards are identified, risks assessed and suitable controls are implemented.
    • Suitable personal protective equipment is selected, used and maintained.
    • The environmental implications of cultivating the site are identified, likely outcomes assessed and, if necessary, responsible action is taken.
  2. Prepare the cultivating equipment
    • The vehicles and equipment required for site cultivation are selected according to the planting plan and organization guidelines.
    • The vehicles and equipment are serviced, adjusted for the conditions and worn parts are replaced to ensure reliability during cultivation.
    • All containers, leftover fluids, waste and debris from the maintenance and servicing work are disposed of safely and appropriately.
    • All maintenance and servicing is documented according to the requirements of the organization’s record keeping system.
  3. Cultivate soil
    • Previous crop or land clearance debris is removed, incorporated or burnt according to the organizations guidelines.
    • The cultivation plan is followed and completed for each site.
    • OHS hazards are identified, risks assessed and suitable controls are implemented.
    • Suitable personal protective equipment is selected, used and maintained.
    • Vehicles and equipment are operated in a safe, effective and efficient manner and at speeds to suit the conditions.
    • The quality of cultivation is maximized by continually checking and adjusting the vehicles and equipment as necessary.
    • All time, resource and quality requirements of the planting plan are met.
  4. Prepare site for planting
    • The planting layout and soil profiles are completed as required by the planting plan.
    • Weed and pest control measures are taken as required by the planting plan.
    • Fertilizers, ameliorants, and/or other pre-planting treatments are applied as required by the planting plan
    • The environmental implications of site preparation are identified, likely outcomes assessed and, if necessary, responsible action is taken.
  5. Complete land preparation operations
    • Equipment is cleaned in accordance with manufacturers specifications, organizational procedures and regulations.
    • Vehicles and equipment are cleaned and stored to minimize damage according to manufacturers specifications, organizational procedures and regulations.
    • All containers, leftover fluids, waste and debris from the cleaning and maintenance work are disposed of safely and appropriately.
    • All required records and documentation are completed accurately and promptly according to organizational requirements.

IMPLEMENT POST-HARVEST PROGRAM (AGR611311) – This unit covers the skills and knowledge required for the process of implementing a post-harvest program for horticultural crops including grading, treating, packing and storing harvested produce. Implementing a post-harvest program is likely to be carried out under limited supervision from others with checking only related to overall progress. The work requires the application of extensive horticultural knowledge and a broad range of horticultural skills. The post-harvest program usually follows established routines, methods and procedures where some discretion and judgment is required.

  1. Prepare for implementation of post-harvest operations
    • Post-harvest operations to be performed are identified according to farm work procedures, the marketing plan and industry guidelines and confirmed with the supervisor.
    • Materials, tools, equipment and machinery are selected according to farm work procedures.
    • Pre-operational and safety checks are carried out on tools, equipment and machinery according to manufacturers specifications and farm work procedures.
    • OHS hazards are identified, risks assessed, controls implemented and reported to the supervisor.
    • Suitable safety and personal protective equipment (PPE) are selected, used and maintained.
  2. Co-ordinate post-harvest work
    • Farm work team is identified and tasks are co-ordinated in a sequential, timely and effective manner in consultation with the supervisor.
    • Post-harvest operations are undertaken according to OHS requirements and with due consideration of the environmental implications.
    • A clean, safe and hygienic work area is maintained throughout and on completion of work.
  3. Implement post-harvest treatments
    • Harvested produce is graded and labelled according to the marketing plan and farm work procedures.
    • Produce that does not meet specifications and farm standards is identified and disposed of according to farm environmental procedures.
    • Post-harvest treatments are selected according to harvested produce requirements, the farm integrated pest management strategy and the marketing plan.
    • Timing, rate, application method, environmental requirements and handling techniques conform to the requirements of the harvested produce, farm work procedures and industry best practice.
    • Post-harvest practices are economical, methodical, meet established work schedules and with minimum damage to produce.
    • Tools, equipment and machinery are cleaned and maintained according to farm work procedures.
  4. Implement hazardous waste disposal guidelines
    • Waste disposal requirements of the farm are reviewed and operational tasks determined.
    • Collection and disposal of waste are monitored according to farm environmental procedures.
    • Conditions likely to impact on business viability are reported promptly to the supervisor.
  5. Implement packaging requirements of produce
    • Packaging requirements specified in the marketing plan and farm work procedures are reviewed and operational tasks determined.
    • Packaging of produce conform to the requirements of the harvested produce, the marketing plan and industry best practice.
    • Packaging materials are selected based on environmentally sound principles.
    • Packaging processes are recorded according to farm work procedures.
  6. Implement storage requirements of produce
    • Storage requirements specified in the marketing plan and farm work procedures are reviewed and operational tasks determined.
    • Storage and handling of produce conform to the requirements of the harvested produce, the marketing plan and industry best practice.
    • Storage processes and facilities are monitored and remedial action taken where necessary.
    • Storage processes and conditions are recorded according to farm work procedures.

IMPLEMENT PLANT NUTRITION PROGRAM (AGR611312) – This unit covers the skills and knowledge required to implement a plant nutrition program in the horticultural or agricultural industry. Implementing a plant nutrition program is likely to be under limited supervision from others, with checking only related to overall progress. The work is usually done within a program, routines, methods and procedures where some discretion and judgement is required in the selection of equipment and materials, organization of work, services, actions, and the achievement of outcomes within time and budgetary constraints.

  1. Prepare for implementation of the plant nutrition program
    • Goals and target site for implementation of the plant nutrition program including soils, plant species and varieties are identified according to farm work procedures.
    • Area and adjacent lands are analysed for soil composition/nutrients.
    • Materials for soil and plant treatments available to the farm are identified and the storage site or supplier details located.
    • Services are located using site plans and in consultation with the supervisor.
    • OHS hazards are identified, risks assessed, controls implemented and reported to the supervisor.
    • Suitable personal protective equipment (PPE) is selected, used and maintained.
  2. Monitor soil pH
    • Soil pH in the implementation site is monitored in relation to plant nutrition and according to farm work procedures.
    • Products useful in changing soil pH are identified, compared, selected and sourced according to farm work procedures.
    • Product application methods are assessed according to product type, soils, farm work procedures, and in due consideration of the environmental implications.
  3. Determine nutritional problems in plants
    • Common nutrient deficiency and toxicity problems in plants are identified using visual inspection.
    • The supervisor and/or nutritional specialist are consulted, as required, to determine causes of nutritional or toxicity problems.
    • Soil ameliorants to improve soil fertility are identified, compared, selected and sourced according to farm work procedures.
  4. Prepare to use fertilizers
    • The fertilizer to be used is selected according to fertilizer type, soils, farm work procedures, in consultation with the supervisor and/or nutritional specialist and in due consideration of the environmental implications.
    • Fertilizer application methods are assessed according to fertilizer type, soils, farm work procedures, and in due consideration of the environmental implications.
    • Fertilizers are applied according to the plant growing cycle and the farm fertilizer calendar.
    • Fertilizers are handled and stored according to farm work procedures and to minimize detrimental environmental impact.
  5. Prepare application equipment
    • Tools, equipment and machinery are selected according to farm work procedures.
    • Pre-operational and safety checks are carried out on tools, equipment and machinery according to manufacturers specifications and farm work procedures.
    • Tools, equipment and machinery are calibrated and adjusted according to manufacturer’s guidelines and farm work procedures.
  6. Apply specific products at appropriate rates
    • Specific products are selected based on their analysis to meet plant needs according to farm work procedures.
    • Product application rates are calculated to optimise plant benefit and minimize environmental impact according to manufacturer’s specifications and farm work procedures.
    • Specific products are applied at the correct rate, timing and method according to the product type and analysis, manufacturers specifications, farm work procedures, and in due consideration of the environmental implications.
    • Product applications are recorded according to farm work procedures.
    • Target plant response to the plant nutrition program, as well as any non-target effects such as environmental impact or pest responses are monitored, documented and reported to the supervisor according to farm work procedures.

CONTROL WEEDS (AGR611313) – This unit covers the skills and knowledge required to control weeds, taking into consideration Integrated Pest Management (IPM) options. Implementation is likely to be under limited supervision from others with checking only related to overall progress. Responsibility for and limited organization of the work of others may be involved. Implementation requires the application of knowledge in areas such as weed recognition, biology and control, and the lifecycles of weed predators and hosts.

  1. Assess weed infestation
    • Scope, density and size of the infestation is assessed.
    • Weeds and beneficial organisms are identified and reported or recorded in field notes.
    • Levels of weed infestations tolerated by the client, market or environment are identified from the integrated pest management (IPM) strategy.
    • Infestation levels, above which plant health or growth objectives are compromised are identified.
    • Professional advice is obtained as required according to enterprise guidelines.
  2. Plan the implementation of control measures
    • Control measures suitable for the infestation are selected from IPM strategy.
    • Tools, equipment and implements are selected for each work activity according to enterprise work procedures.
    • OHS hazards are identified, risks assessed, controls implemented and reported to the supervisor.
    • Suitable safety equipment and personal protective equipment (PPE) are selected, used, maintained and stored.
    • Control measures selected need to be in full consideration of environmental implications
    • Control of harmful weeds with the use of cover crops
  3. Implement control measures
    • Enterprise work team, contractors and IPM product suppliers are coordinated in a sequential, timely and effective manner in consultation with the supervisor.
    • Control measures are implemented according to the IPM principles (e.g. water management for rice).
    • Implementation of IPM activities is undertaken according to OHS requirements.
    • A clean and safe work area is maintained throughout and on completion of each work activity.
    • Land is prepared to ensure weed elimination.
    • Records are maintained as required by legislation and enterprise guidelines.
  4. Monitor control weeds
    • Control methods are monitored to identify side effects to other plants, animals or external environment.
    • Effectiveness of control methods are assessed in reference to specified industry and enterprise standards.
    • Adjustments to IPM control methods are implemented where necessary to meet enterprise specifications.

PREPARE AND APPLY CHEMICALS (AGR611314) – This unit covers the skills and knowledge required to prepare and apply chemicals for the control of weeds, pests and diseases. It requires knowledge of the chemicals related to the workplace, the hazards and risks involved in their use, and the specific safety procedures prescribed for working unsupervised within organizational guidelines. It requires the ability to handle and apply chemicals ensuring minimum risk to self, others and environment and accurately record their use.

  1. Determine the need for chemical use
    • Nature and level of the pest, weed infestation or disease is identified.
    • Need for action is assessed as per established procedures.
    • Requirement for chemical use as an option within an integrated pest management strategy is assessed.
    • Hazard and risk analysis of different chemical options is undertaken.
    • Requirement for chemical application including coverage by appropriate insurance is identified and confirmed.
  2. Prepare appropriate chemical
    • Chemical label and Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) are read and understood.
    • Labels are checked to ensure chemicals meet user requirements and specifications.
    • Chemicals are prepared from those registered for the intended purpose, and to suit the organization’s chemical use strategy.
    • Legislation and regulations concerning chemical use are identified and followed.
    • Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) hazards and risks and risk control requirements associated with use of the chemical are identified.
  3. Prepare to use chemicals according to the label and MSDS
    • Personal protective equipment is selected and checked for use according to the product label and MSDS.
    • Requirements for pre and post-operative checks on equipment are followed.
    • Damage, wear or malfunctions of any equipment is identified and reported or repaired.
    • Requirements for the selection, preparation and adjustment of application equipment and tools for the appropriate chemicals are followed.
    • Mixing rates are defined and calculated.
    • Directions, standards and legislative requirements for mixing chemicals are followed.
  4. Apply chemicals
    • Meteorological conditions and forecasts are assessed prior to and during application.
    • Hazards of particular chemicals are identified.
    • Risks to others and the environment are assessed and controlled.
    • Application equipment calibration procedures are followed.
    • Procedures and precautions for the use of the chemicals are interpreted from labels and accreditation requirements.
    • Requirements for chemical handling and application are determined from directions, standards and legislative requirements.
    • Chemicals are applied safely and effectively according to directions.
    • Chemical spills or accident procedures are followed.
    • First aid equipment is made available on site.
  5. Clean up following chemical application
    • Tools or equipment required to clean up chemicals are selected.
    • Requirements for cleaning equipment and sites are defined and followed according to directions and standards.
    • Requirements for disposing of unused chemicals, empty containers or spilled material are defined from directions and standards.
    • Procedures for reporting chemical spills are followed.
  6. Record application details
    • Application of chemicals is recorded according to organization procedures, label directions and legislation.
    • Details of the specific chemical concerned are recorded correctly in the chemical inventory according to regulations.
    • Inventory of personal protective equipment and application equipment is recorded.
    • Procedures and requirements for reporting application details to senior management or client are followed.
    • Records of injury or poisoning associated with application of chemical are made and provided to the appropriate person.

ESTABLISH AGRONOMIC CROPS (AGR611320) – This unit covers the skills and knowledge required for establishing agronomic crops. It includes preparing machinery and equipment, ploughing/cultivating, seeding, applying any pre-planting treatments, maintaining machinery and equipment, relevant record keeping It requires the application of skills and knowledge to use specialised equipment to carry out seeding and fertilizer operations appropriate to soil and weather conditions. Equipment and machinery may be animal-powered. In addition, it requires an awareness of licensing requirements, safe workplace and positive environmental practices associated with seeding operations including sustainable land management. The work functions in this standard involve the application of some judgement and discretion and are likely to be carried out under minimal supervision within farm guidelines.

  1. Prepare machinery and equipment for use
    • Machinery and equipment is selected and confirmed against the work plan and prepared to manufacturers specifications. Equipment is securely attached and calibrated for operation to manufacturers specifications.
    • Existing and potential OHS hazards in the workplace are identified, risks assessed and controlled in line with farm requirements.
  2. Prepare for agronomic crop establishment
    • Soil and weather conditions are monitored for optimal seeding conditions.
    • Soil conservation and sustainable land management practices and procedures are recognized and confirmed in accordance with farm requirements and environmental concerns.
    • Seeding, fertilizer, and pest and weed control requirements are confirmed against the work plan and prepared to manufacturers specifications using safe handling procedures.
    • Contingency plans are prepared for unusual seasonal conditions and pest/disease outbreaks.
  3. Sow the crop
    • Suitable personal protective clothing and equipment is selected, used and maintained in accordance with OHS requirements.
    • Seeding and fertilizer applications are carried out in line with the work plan.
    • Pest and weed control treatment is co-ordinated with seeding and fertilizer applications as required.
    • Environmental implications associated with sowing operations are identified, assessed and controlled in line with farm requirements.
  4. Complete seeding operations
    • Seeding, machinery and equipment operation records are maintained in accordance with farm requirements.
    • Machinery and equipment damage, malfunctions or irregular performance are reported in line with farm requirements.
    • Machinery and equipment is cleaned, secured and stored in line with manufacturer’s specifications and farm requirements.

UNDERTAKE AGRONOMIC CROP MAINTENANCE ACTIVITIES (AGR611321) – This unit covers the skills and knowledge required for maintaining agronomic crops. It involves the process of assessing crop condition to identify abnormalities caused by pests, weeds, soil nutrient deficiencies and soil conditions, applying pests, disease and plant disorders and weed control measures to maximize crop production and providing crop fertilizer requirements. Monitoring agronomic crops is likely to be carried out under limited supervision from others with checking only related to overall progress. It is usually done within established routines, methods and procedures where some discretion and judgment is required in the selection of equipment and materials, organization of work, services, actions and the achievement of outcomes within time and budgetary constraints.

  1. Assess agronomic crop condition, growth and requirements
    • Crops are monitored to assess their needs and observations are recorded and reported.
    • Pest and disease control alternatives are identified in line  with species and level of infestation present and taking into account consultant advice if obtained.
    • Economic threshold data is identified in line with action targets.
    • Sites for regular measurement of soil moisture are established in consultation with survey advice.
    • Soil probe is used to measure moisture levels and soil water percentage calculated.
    • Water requirements are calculated in line with standing crop and forecast weather conditions.
  2. Apply fertilizer and amendments
    • OHS hazards are identified, risks assessed and suitable controls are implemented.
    • Suitable personal protective equipment is selected, used and maintained.
    • Specialist sprays are selected and applied to organization standard and taking into account consultant advice if obtained.
    • Specialist sprays are OHS hazards are identified, risks assessed and suitable controls are implemented.according to industry standards for growth stages.
    • Chipping or spot spraying is carried out as an integral part of weed control programs.
    • Crop growth stages and keys are assessed, recorded and reported.
    • Water is applied according to the identified need and the requirements of the organization.
    • All applications are undertaken in the full consideration of adverse environmental impacts.
  3. Monitor crop condition, growth and requirements
    • Crop maturity is monitored and the need for further applications is determined in consultation with the manager.
    • The health of the crop is continually monitored and corrections to growing plan are made as and when required.
    • The timing of harvest is determined in consultation with contractors and property manager.
  4. Complete cleaning and hygiene operations
    • Equipment is cleaned in accordance with manufacturers specifications, organizational procedures and regulations. All containers, leftover fluids, waste and debris from the maintenance and servicing work are disposed of safely and appropriately.
    • All required records and documentation are completed accurately and promptly in accordance with organizational requirements.

UNDERTAKE AGRONOMIC CROP HARVESTING ACTIVITIES (AGR611322) – This unit covers the skills and knowledge required for the process of harvesting agronomic crops. It includes preparing machinery and equipment, supplies and materials needed, harvesting, cleaning and maintaining machinery and equipment and completing workplace records. Harvesting may also be carried out using manually or animal-powered tools and equipment. Harvesting is likely to be carried out under limited supervision. Overall progress may be checked periodically and will usually follow set routines, methods and procedures.

  1. Prepare to harvest agronomic crops
    • Requirements for the work to be undertaken, method and order of harvesting is interpreted from the harvest strategy and confirmed with the supervisor.
    • OHS hazards are identified, risks assessed and suitable controls are implemented.
    • Suitable personal protective equipment is selected, used and maintained.
    • The environmental implications of harvesting the crop are identified, likely outcomes assessed and, if necessary, responsible action is taken.
    • Windrowing/swathing is completed to the standard required by the harvest strategy.
    • Crop is sampled for moisture content against the classification standards.
    • The hygiene standards for the crop and the site are identified from the harvest strategy and/or the crop storage plan.
  2. Prepare the harvesting equipment
    • Harvesting machinery and other equipment are cleaned of pests and other contaminants to maintain crop and site hygiene standards, as required by the harvest strategy.
    • All machinery and equipment are serviced, assessed for reliability, adjusted for harvesting conditions and appropriate parts are replaced to ensure reliability during the harvest.
    • All containers, leftover fluids, waste and debris from the maintenance and servicing work are disposed of safely and appropriately.
    • All maintenance and servicing is documented according to the requirements of the organizations record keeping system.
  3. Harvest crops
    • The harvest strategy is followed and completed for each site. 3.2 OHS hazards are identified, risks assessed and suitable controls are implemented.
    • Suitable personal protective equipment is selected, used and maintained.
    • The environmental implications of harvesting are identified, likely outcomes assessed and, if necessary, responsible action is taken.
    • Harvesting machinery and ancillary equipment is operated in a safe manner and at speeds to suit crop conditions.
    • The quality of the crop is maximized by maintaining the hygiene of all surfaces that come into contact with the crop.
    • The quality of the crop is maximized by continually checking and, where necessary, adjusting the harvester and ancillary equipment, including their height and other settings.
  4. Complete harvesting operations
    • Equipment is cleaned in accordance with manufacturer’s specifications, organizational procedures and regulations.
    • Attachments and other ancillary equipment are cleaned and stored to minimize damage and to maximize hygiene according to manufacturer’s specifications, organizational procedures and regulations.
    • Insecticides are applied as required by the organization and the harvest strategy.
    • All containers, leftover fluids, waste and debris from the maintenance and servicing work are disposed of safely and appropriately.
    • All required records and documentation are completed accurately and promptly in accordance with organizational requirements.

SAVE, PREPARE AND STORE AGRICULTURAL SEED (AGR611323) – This unit covers the skills and knowledge required for selecting grain and other seed from agricultural crops for use as seed, to calculate the quantity required, to grade and test it, and subsequently to store the seed for use in the following season. Seed stocks are selected and stored to ensure maximum quality and yield when used.

  1. Select seed from agricultural crops
    • The quantity of seed required to sow the following season’s crop is calculated.
    • The area of crop needed to produce the required quantity of seed for the following season’s crop is calculated.
    • A portion of the crop to be used as seed is selected, based on the calculated requirements and its health, vigour, and grain size.
    • The soil type and elevation/climatic conditions in the selected portion of the crop are noted for potential input to management decision-making.
    • Measures are taken to preserve seed and plant health, vigour and uniformity within the selected area.
    • The application of any chemicals to the crop is undertaken in full consideration of detrimental environmental impacts.
    • All work carried out is done using the appropriate personal protective equipment and is within OHS guidelines.
  2. Evaluate and grade seed
    • After harvest, the grain variety saved is assessed for its suitability for the location, the soil, and the organization’s current marketing requirements.
    • Information regarding new varieties or trial results and progress is sourced for input to management decision-making.
    • The seed is graded to the required size either on or off-site.
    • Fungicidal and insecticidal dressings are applied to the seed where appropriate and according to the organizations production and marketing requirements.
    • Test samples are taken, prepared and forwarded to the analyzing body, according to the guidelines of that body.
    • Records of observations, information gathered, and results of tests and grading are kept, updated, and maintained according to the requirements of the organization and the industry.
      2.7 The records kept are forwarded to the appropriate person for analysis and decision-making.
  3. Store seed
    • The storage facilities to be used are selected and hygienically prepared.
    • Seed is transferred to the storage facility according to the organizations OHS and hygiene guidelines.
    • Seed is stored under conditions that maintain its quality and germination capacity.
    • Periodical checks of seed in long-term storage are conducted for quality factors and viability according to enterprise requirements.
    • Seed samples for laboratory testing are taken as required.
    • Test samples are taken, prepared and forwarded for analysis according to prescribed guidelines.
    • Clear and accurate records of seed storage, tests and inspections are created, maintained and kept as described in the seed storage program.
    • The condition of storage facilities is monitored using the schedule and methods outlined in the seed storage program.
    • Where it is required, appropriate corrective action is taken to maintain seed quality.
    • Activities around the seed storage facilities are undertaken according to the OHS guidelines detailed in the grain storage program.
  4. Collect and deliver seed
    • Delivery or supply terms are established and applied when collecting or delivering seed.
    • Seed sold or purchased conforms to local State and Federal legislation and regulations.
    • Regulations relating to the interstate movement of seeds are observed.

IMPLEMENT VERTEBRATE PEST CONTROL PROGRAM (AGR611324) – This unit covers the skills and knowledge required to plan and implement a strategy for the control of vertebrate pests in a rural environment. It requires the application of knowledge and skills to assess the severity of pest infestation and determine methods and applications for the effective control of vertebrate pests without harm to other species or the environment. Competency requires an awareness of legislative requirements with regard to animal welfare, biosecurity, safety and environmental protection. The work in this standard is likely to be carried out under routine supervision within farm guidelines.

  1. Assess requirements for pest control
    • Vertebrate pest control requirements are assessed and clarified according to farm objectives.
    • Inspections are carried out to ascertain type and severity of pest infestations.
    • Control agents and methods of application to prevent, control or manage vertebrate pests are determined.
    • Control program is developed for implementation according to farm requirements.
  2. Prepare to implement control program
    • Suitable personal protective equipment is selected, used and maintained according to OHS requirements.
    • Equipment and materials required to support the implementation of control program are arranged.
    • Relevant licenses and permits are obtained according to legislative requirements.
    • Safe working practices are observed and followed according to OHS and farm requirements.
  3. Control vertebrate pests
    • Control program is implemented according to OHS, legislative and farm requirements.
    • Safeguards are employed to ensure that targeted pests are controlled and all other species remain unharmed.
    • Integrated health management is considered and implemented as required.
    • Environmental impacts are assessed and controlled according to legislative and farm requirements.
  4. Complete control program
    • Carcasses and control agents are disposed of according to environmental and industry Codes of Practice.
    • Control program and outcomes are reviewed and evaluated for future best practice and planning management.
    • Equipment and work areas are cleaned and returned to operating order according to OHS and farm requirements.
    • Relevant information is documented and maintained to industry standards and farm requirements.

BASIC COMPETENCIES (18 Hours)

UNIT CODE BASIC COMPETENCIES
500311109 Lead workplace communication
500311110 Lead small teams
500311111 Develop and practice negotiation skills
500311112 Solve problems related to work activities
500311113 Use mathematical concepts and techniques
500311114 Use relevant technologies

LEAD WORKPLACE COMMUNICATION (500311109) – This unit covers the knowledge, skills and attitudes required to lead in the dissemination and discussion of ideas, information and issues in the workplace.

  1. Communicate information about workplace processes
  2. Lead workplace discussions
  3. Identify and communicate issues arising in the workplace

LEAD SMALL TEAMS (500311110) – This unit covers the knowledge, skills and attitudes to lead small teams including setting and maintaining team and individual performance standards.

  1. Provide team leadership
  2. Assign responsibilities among members
  3. Set performance expectation for team members
  4. Supervise team performance

DEVELOP AND PRACTICE NEGOTIATION SKILLS (500311111) – This unit covers the skills, knowledge and attitudes  required to collect information in order to negotiate to a desired outcome and participate in the negotiation.

  1. Identify relevant information in planning negotiations
  2. Participate in negotiations
  3. Document areas for agreement

SOLVE PROBLEMS RELATED TO WORK ACTIVITIES (500311112) – This unit of covers the knowledge, skills and  attitudes required to solve problems in the workplace including the application of problem solving techniques and to determine and resolve the root cause of problems.

  1. Explain the analytical techniques
  2. Identify the problem.
  3. Determine the possible cause/s of the problem

USE MATHEMATICAL CONCEPTS AND TECHNIQUES (500311113) – This unit covers the knowledge, skills and attitudes required in the application of mathematical concepts and techniques.

  1. Identify mathematical tools and techniques to solve problem
  2. Apply mathematical procedures/solution
  3. Analyze results

USE RELEVANT TECHNOLOGIES (500311114) – This unit of competency covers the knowledge, skills, and attitude required in selecting, sourcing and applying appropriate and affordable technologies in the workplace.

  1. Identify appropriate technology
  2. Apply relevant technology
  3. Maintain/enhance relevant technology

COMMON COMPETENCIES (14 Hours)

UNIT CODE COMMON COMPETENCIES
AGR321201 Apply safety measures in farm operations
AGR321202 Use farm tools and equipment
AGR321203 Perform estimation and calculations

APPLY SAFETY MEASURES IN FARM OPERATIONS (AGR321201) – This unit covers the knowledge, skills and attitudes  required to perform safety measures effectively and efficiently. It includes identifying areas, tools, materials, time and place in performing safety measures.

  1. Determine areas of concern for safety measures
  2. Apply appropriate safety measures
  3. Safekeep/maintain/ dispose tools, materials and outfit.

USE FARM TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT (AGR321202) – This unit covers the knowledge, skills and attitudes required to use farm tools and equipment. It includes selection, operation and preventive maintenance of farm tools and equipment.

  1. Prepare and use farm tools
  2. Prepare and operate farm equipment
  3. Perform preventive maintenance procedures/practices

PERFORM ESTIMATION AND BASIC CALCULATION (AGR321203) – This unit covers the knowledge, skills and attitudes  required to perform basic workplace calculations relating to feeds, fertilizer and related quantities.

  1. Perform estimation
  2. Perform basic workplace calculation
  3. Apply corrective measures as necessary

ELECTIVE COMPETENCIES

UNIT CODE ELECTIVE COMPETENCIES
AGR611325 Follow site quarantine procedures
AGR611326 Collect samples for a rural production or horticultural monitoring program
AGR611327 Handle bulk materials in storage area
AGR611328 Prepare grain storage
AGR611329 Comply with industry quality assurance requirements
AGR611330 Maintain and monitor environmental work practices
AGR611331 Keep records for farm business
AGR611332 Perform specialized machinery maintenance
AGR611333 Install irrigation systems

FOLLOW SITE QUARANTINE PROCEDURES (AGR611325) – This unit covers the skills and knowledge required to follow enterprise site quarantine procedures that are designed to reduce the likelihood of pathogenic organisms entering the site. Site quarantine procedures are followed as a routine part of one’s own work and are applied to visitors to the site. Work is performed under supervision and according to established procedures and policies.

  1. Prepare to work in quarantine site
  2. Work in quarantine site
  3. Assist in maintaining site quarantine procedures
  4. Respond to site quarantine breach or problem

COLLECT SAMPLES FOR A RURAL PRODUCTION OR HORTICULTURE MONITORING PROGRAM (AGR611326) –  This unit covers the skills and knowledge required to collect samples as part of a rural production or horticulture monitoring program or while conducting post-mortem examination of livestock or other animals. It requires the ability to plan for collecting, prepare equipment and resources, carry out collecting, and complete collecting activities. Collecting samples requires knowledge of industry sampling and preserving guidelines and protocols, types of tissue that might be collected, environmental legislation, and sampling and preserving methods. Samples collected will usually be analyzed by laboratory staff, although collection staff may undertake some tests.

  1. Plan for collection of samples
  2. Prepare equipment and resources
  3. Carry out sampling and preserving procedures
  4. Complete sample collection activities

HANDLE BULK MATERIALS IN STORAGE AREA (AGR611327) – This unit covers the skills and knowledge required This competency standard covers the process of receiving, moving and sampling bulk materials in a storage area. It includes the use of safety equipment and procedures, and the repair of the facility and equipment used to store the bulk materials. Bulk materials are handled to industry standards in relation to segregation and storage conditions ensuring minimum loss or damage and optimum returns. The handling of bulk materials in storage areas is likely to be carried out under limited supervision. Overall progress may be checked periodically. The handling of bulk materials in storage areas will usually follow set routines, methods and procedures.

  1. Prepare to work in bulk materials storage area
  2. Sample bulk materials for testing
  3. Move bulk materials into and out of storage
  4. Repair and maintain storage facility

PREPARE GRAIN STORAGES (AGRA611328) – This unit covers the skills and knowledge required to safely maintain the site, the storage and equipment for handling, and storage of bulk materials. At the completion of the work described in this standard, storages, surrounding areas and equipment are prepared in readiness for receiving grain at an acceptable level of hygiene. Work is likely to be under routine supervision with intermittent checking. Responsibility for some roles and co-ordination within a team may be required. Preparing bulk material storages is usually within established routines, methods and procedures. Competency at this level involves the application of knowledge and skills in the maintenance of facilities, tools and equipment.

  1. Prepare to work in bulk material storage area
  2. Prepare storage area
  3. Prepare storages
  4. Prepare bulk material handling machinery
  5. Complete maintenance operations

COMPLY WITH INDUSTRY QUALITY ASSURANCE REQUIREMENTS (AGR611329) – This unit covers the skills and knowledge required to comply with industry quality assurance requirements in the production of meat, milk or eggs. It requires the ability to implement quality assurance practices on food safety, quality, and animal welfare, biosecurity, implement standard operating procedures, and report problems that affect quality. Complying with industry quality assurance requirements requires knowledge of industry quality assurance requirements, animal production processes, Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) approach to quality assurance, and enterprise policies, guidelines and standard operating procedures relating to food safety, quality and animal welfare.

  1. Implement quality assurance practices on food safety and quality, biosecurity and animal welfare
  2. Implement standard operating procedures
  3. Report problems that affect quality

MAINTAIN AND MONITOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PRACTICES (AGR611330) – This unit covers the skills and knowledge required to maintain and monitor positive environmental work practices. It requires the ability to recognize basic environmental hazards and threats. It includes the ability to follow and give workplace directions and instructions by communicating accurately with supervisors and workplace colleagues, and to keep records. Maintaining and monitoring environmental work practices requires awareness of, and an ability to implement relevant environmental legislation, policies and workplace/industry practices.

  1. Maintain workplace environmental procedures
  2. Recognize and report on potential environmental threats
  3. Support continuous improvement of environmental work practices
  4. Maintain environmental records

KEEP RECORDS FOR A FARM BUSINESS (AGR611331) – This unit covers the skills and knowledge required. This competency standard covers the process of creating and maintaining physical records, preparing and processing basic financial transactions, establishing and maintaining a cashbook, and reconciling and preparing invoices within primary production businesses. Both the physical and financial records of the business are vital for use by management for planning purposes, meeting legislative requirements, and the efficient operation of the business on a daily basis.

  1. Prepare and store physical records
  2. Process petty cash transactions
  3. Establish and maintain cash book
  4. Reconcile invoices for payment to creditors
  5. Prepare invoices for debtors

PERFORM SPECIALISED MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE (AGR611332) – This unit covers the skills and knowledge required to maintain specialized machinery and equipment. Specialized machinery and equipment refers to machinery and equipment used principally in agriculture and horticulture, work where there is high wear and tear on components. It requires the ability to carry out engine and equipment checks, undertake transmission checks, maintain high wear components and attachments, and record maintenance work. Performing specialized machinery maintenance requires knowledge of general machine function principles and maintenance, and operational replacement wear component requirements and procedures.

  1. Carry out prime mover checks
  2. Carry out transmission checks
  3. Maintain components and attachments
  4. Record maintenance

INSTALL IRRIGATION SYSTEMS (AGR611333) – This unit covers the skills and knowledge required to install pressurised irrigation systems. It requires the ability to organize resources for installation work, set out and prepare site, install irrigation components, complete installation work, commission irrigation systems and communicate with work team members, supervisors, contractors and consultants. Installing irrigation systems requires knowledge of methods and techniques of irrigation, components of an irrigation system, behavior of water on varying terrain and soil types, soil water retention testing techniques and soil characteristics, and enterprise OHS procedures.

  1. Organize resources for installation work
  2. Set out and prepare site
  3. Install irrigation components
  4. Complete installation work
  5. Commission irrigation system

TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT AND MATERIALS AGRICULTURAL CROPS PRODUCTION NC III

Recommended list of tools, equipment and materials for the training of Agricultural Crops Production NC III

TOOLS EQUIPMENT MATERIALS
Bolos Booth/temporary shed Agri bags, plastic
Broomstick Cart (Kariton & paragus) Bamboo stick
Calculator Coolroom Basket
Container Comb-tooth harrow Bond paper
Cutting tools Computer with record keeping Catching nets
Digging tools Crates Clips
Drying meter Drying oven Coconut dust
Dulos Farm / field Compost
Fruit crate Greenhouse / nursery Fertilizers-various
Harvesting tools Harvesting equipment First aide supplies/medicine
Hat Irrigation system (sprinkler, mist/drip irrigation) Flower inducer
Knapsack sprayer Mower (grass cutter) Fungicides
Knife Over head projector (OHP) Gloves
Light hoe Portable chain saw Growing media (garden soil, sewed sand, compost, soil, manure and sawdust/rice
Moisture meter Post-Harvest treatment equipment Killing bottles
Personal protection equipment Power sprayer
Petri-dish Propagation Equipment Marking pens
pH meter Pump for irrigation Masks
Pick mattock Rotavator Material Safety Data Sheets
Picking knife Service vehicle Mulching material
Plow Sorting /Grading equipment Hair nets
Plumbing tools Spike tooth harrow Packaging materials
Post-Harvest treatment tools Storage room Pail
Protective coat Surface irrigation system Paper/bond
Protective gadgets Tractor/Carabao Pencil
Pruning sheers Typewriter Pens
Rake Pesticides/Insectici des
Scissors TRAINING MATERIALS Pieces of cloth
Seed bed Brochures Plastic bag
Seedling tray Instructional supplies & materials Plumbing supplies
Shovel Visual aids Pots
Sprinklers Reference materials/Books (technical information on horticultural and agronomic crops) Propagation materials e.g. seeds spores, cuttings etc.,
Step ladder (first aide kit with reference manual) Propagating media (garden soil, sawdust, sand, composed, coconut coir)
Storage tools/cabinet Data (Data on result of soil analysis) Rice hull
Transplanting tools Procedural manuals Rope, (small, med. Large)
Trowel Soil samples analysis Rubber band
Examples of farm standard operating procedures (SOPs) Rubber boots
Rubber knots
Sacks
Sample of matured vegetable crops
Seed box
Seedlings, assorted
Seeds
Soil auger
String
Tetrazolium chemical
Transplanting supplies
Detergent, liquid and powder soap
Brush

DEFINITION OF TERMS

For the purpose of this standard, the word

  • Aflatoxin – the toxin produced by some strains of the fungi ASPERGILUS FLAVUS and ASPERGILUS PARASTICUS; the most potent carcinogen yet discovered.
  • Agronomy – the application of the various soil and plant sciences to soil management and raising of crops.
  • Agronomic crops – may include coarse grains, grain legumes, coffee, coconuts, cotton, soya beans, peanuts and sugar cane.
  • Agricultural crops – may include fruits, vegetables, herbs, flowers, foliage, bulbs, tubers, nuts, mushrooms, wild harvest plants and oils.
  • Ambient condition– ordinary room temperature and relative humidity.
  • Ambient air – the surrounding air (atmospheric).
  • Ambient storage – any treatment or practice extending post harvest life of harvested commodity beyond that of similar commodity held under ambient conditions without treatment.
  • Airflow rate – the amount of air passing through an obstruction per unit of time.
  • ACIAR – Australian Center for International Agricultural Research
  • AFHB – ASEAN Food Handling Bureau
  • BPRE – Bureau of Post harvest Research & Extension
  • Curing – process of toughening and self-healing of bruises and skinned areas in root and tubes crops or the rapid closing of the neck of bulb crops under favourable conditions
  • Driller – a machine for sowing in furrows
  • Drip Irrigation – application of water through small tubes and orifices or emitters which discharge small quantity of water to the base of the plant
  • Dry-bulb temperature – the temperature of air indicated by a standard temperature
  • Equilibrium moisture content – the moisture content at which moisture in a product is in equilibrium with the surrounding air. The product does not gain or loss moisture.
  • Fogging – to cover or envelope with fog
  • Foliar Fertilizer – fertilizer formulation containing nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium plus selected micronutrient element such as (Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, Zn, Cl, B, Cu, S) applied by spraying on the leaves
  • Fumigant – a chemical compound which acts in the gaseous state to destroy insects and their larvae.
  • Fumigation – the process of treating stored products with insecticides/pesticides and the like in fumes or vapor form.
  • Furrow Irrigation – a method of supplying water through a canal system wherein water flows down or across the slope of the field
  • Furrowing – final step in land preparation by making furrows or beds for planting
  • GATT – General Agreement on Tariff and Trade
  • Grading – the process of classifying into groups according to a set of recognized criteria of quality and size, each group bearing an accepted name and size grouping.
  • Growing Medium – mixture of different materials such as soil, sand, compost, coir dust, rice hull, perlite, peat, etc. for growing seedlings
  • HACCP – Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points
  • Hardening – the process of gradually withholding water and exposing to direct sunlight to prevent seedlings from transplanting stress/shock
  • Harrowing – breaking of large soil clods that are caused by plowing
  • Hilling-Up – the process of covering the applied fertilizer material by raising the soil towards the base of the plant to further stabilize its stand for better plant growth.
  • Hygrometer – an instrument that measures humidity.
  • Insect pest – a destructive or harmful insect.
  • Irrigation – any method of supplying water to sustain plant growth
  • Off-Baring– process of cultivating the soil away from the base of the plants
  • Pricking-Off– methods of transferring of seedling to avoid overcrowding
  • Larvae – the first stage of the life cycle of insects after leaving the egg.
  • Manometer – an instrument that measures air pressure.
  • Maturity – the quality or state of ripeness, or of being fully developed grain.
  • Maturity index – signs or indications that a commodity is mature and is ready to be harvested.
  • Moisture content – the conventional index used to determine whether the seed is dry enough for safe storage or for milling usually expressed in percent (% M.C.).
  • Molds – superficial often woolly growth produced on various forms of organic matter, especially when damp or decaying.
  • NFA – National Food Authority
  • Packaging – technology or process to ensure adequate protection and safe delivery of a product from the produces to the ultimate consumer.
  • Packing – act of putting commodities in a container.
  • Packinghouse – place where the preparatory steps for storage or marketing are done.
  • Pallet – low portable platform made of wood or metal or in combination to facilitate handling, storage or transport of materials as a unit load using forklift.
  • Perishables – food crops for which value and/or quality is maintained over a short period of time after harvest. These include fruits, vegetables, flowers, young coconut, nursery stocks and some staple root crops such as sweet potato, cassava and yam.
  • Postharvest disease – disease observed after harvest regardless of when or where initial infestation took place.
  • Post harvest handling – specific term used for the movement of commodities and operations through which a commodity undergoes from harvest to possession of the fixed consumer, includes the technological aspects of marketing and distribution.
  • Post harvest infection – infection that takes place after harvest.
  • Post harvest life – period of time during which a commodity is still acceptable for its intended purpose.
  • Pre cooling – strictly, it means the rapid cooling (48 hours or less) of a commodity to a desired transit or storage temperature soon after harvest before it is stored or moved in transit.
  • Pupa – an intermediate stage of an insect that preys on one or more plants and animals that man wishes to preserve for his own use.
  • Refrigeration – process of removing heat from a compartment or substance so that temperature is lowered and then maintained at a desirable level, usually refers to refrigeration by mechanical means.
  • Relative humidity – the actual vapor pressure of the air relative to saturation.
  • Respiration – biological process by which organic materials are broken down to simpler forms accompanied by the release of energy and heat.
  • Ripening – the state of development of a fruit when it becomes soft and edible applies strictly to climacteric type fruit.
  • Rodents – refer to rats and mice which destroy grains and other stored products.
  • Senescence – final phase in the life of an organ in which a series of normally irreversible events are initiated leading to cellular breakdown or death of the organ.
  • Side-Dress Fertilizer – additional amount of any fertilizer materials applied at the onset of flowering to complete the nutritional requirement of the crop
  • Sprinkler Irrigation – a mechanical method of supplying water over the standing crop by means of a nozzle which is rotated by water pressure
  • Synthetic Mulch – mulching materials made either of polyethylene or non-woven fabric
  • Sorting – the process of classifying into groups designated by the person classifying crops or commodities the produce either according to a set criteria.
  • Standard – the set of criteria and specifications of quality determining the grades, described as product characteristics such as maturity, color, cleanliness, shape, free from decay and blemishes and uniformity of size.
  • Storage – process of keeping horticultural crops in a structure designed to protect the stored products from inclement weather and pests for a short or long period of time to await processing or movement to other location.
  • Storage life – the longest time produce can be kept in a sound marketable condition.
  • Tachometer – an instrument that measures revolutions per minute
  • Tillage – the mechanical manipulation of the soil
  • Transplants – vegetable seedlings produced for transplanting
  • Trellis – a support structure for vinyl crops and can either be T, I, Y, A shaped
  • Velometer – an instrument that measures velocity of air flow
  • Waxing – application of a thin film of surface coating to fruits and vegetables.
  • Wet-bulb temperature – temperature of moist air indicated by a thermometer whose bulb is covered with a moist wick which the air flow passing over has a velocity of 15 ft per second.

List of Schools that offer TESDA Courses for Agricultural Crops Production


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  1. I need training course
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